All Posts By

Joe James

Who’s your “who”?

By | Collaboration, Culture

Recently, my wife and I discussed a question her manager had posed to all his direct reports: “Who’s your ‘who’?” In other words, “Who’s that person or people that comes to mind when you ask yourself ‘Why do I do this?'” In our conversation, both mine and my wife’s answer were simultaneous, unanimous, and I imagine common for many individuals: it was each other and our children.

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Zen and the Art of Data Quality

By | Business Intelligence, Data

A few years ago I picked up a book called Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. A friend had recommended it to me with very few details other than, “You would like it.” What I found was not a manual about keeping your cool while tackling tricky motorcycle problems, but a treatise on quality. The author, Robert Pirsig, wove a beautiful tale of a man driven mad attempting to understand “Quality” and his cross country motorcycle road trip towards reconciliation. My friend was right, and I started thinking about how quality impacted everything. How we evaluate things and make decisions is all built on the foundation of Quality.

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ATL: EPIC Growth

By | Collaboration, Community, Consultancy, Culture, Ownership

The SEI Atlanta office has grown in leaps and bounds since its inception. True to the SEI model, the growth has not been concentrated to a single area, but has been evenly distributed across the project engagement, recruiting, and collaborative aspects of our business. This expansion has brought with it a new challenge: maintaining the culture that was integral in achieving the aforementioned growth. In the face of substantial quarter over quarter growth, SEI-ATL has strived to stay true to the EPIC model in order to preserve its culture and high recruiting standards.

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Beyond Transparency

By | Collaboration, Culture

When looking for meaning behind a process or decision, how often have you heard: “That’s just always the way we’ve done it” and have the conversation end right there?  After hearing this, you’ll probably go through the following stages of “Business as Usual”: anger at the easy response, confusion as you try to probe for a more meaningful answer, and finally acceptance when you decide that no one really knows why a particular action or process is done.  This vagueness and complacency around even the most frequent or critical actions was something I’d come to accept as a norm in almost every organization.  That is until I was introduced to SEI.

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